The Ones that Got Away – Art Deco Antiques we passed on.

For our 100th post, Chris thought it would be “fun” to look back on the Art Deco items we passed on and have regretted since. As he often says, “The time to buy an antique is when you see it; because it can’t be reordered.” We tend to be pretty savvy shoppers on our adventures; none-the-less, we’ve missed a few.

Part of the Roseville 1928-1929 Futura line, catalogue #393-12, better known as “Four Ball” vase, it is indeed a rare find. Regularly selling in the $1200.00 range, we found one at Antique World in Clarence, NY for $65.00 dollars. This was early on in our joint collecting. Since these pieces are unmarked Anthony wasn’t sure if it was a Futura vase. We didn’t have smart phones back then and Anthony felt we didn’t know enough about Roseville to justify spending the money. When we got home, he did some research and back we went the next day. Not to our surprise, but to our disappointment, it had been sold. We still kick ourselves over this one.

Another one we kick ourselves for was a set of six Chase chrome 1930’s canapé trays. Designed so that you could hold the plate and drink with one hand, this is a relatively hard to find item. Found at the Asbury Methodist Church Flea Market in Rochester, NY, they were in excellent condition and priced at about $40.00.  We just purchased a cobalt mirror picture frame and didn’t want to spend more money that day. Dumb mistake!

Although not entirely sure, Chris believes he passed on 4 circa 1930 Crown Ducal cocktail plates at the local Goodwill. Currently selling at about $75.00 per plate, the Goodwill price was $2.99 per plate.

On a trip to Bay City Antique Center, Bay City, Michigan, we passed on an art deco copper and chrome hostess stand priced at only $125.00. Buried, dusty and obviously overlooked for some time, we debated on this for quite a while. It boiled down to what do we do with it. Reason ruled but we still think about this one.

 

We failed to pick up a Westinghouse Columaire grandfather clock / radio at the Old Mill Antique Mall, West Columbia, South Carolina. Designed in 1930 by Raymond Loewy, it was part of the Westinghouse Company’s 1931 catalog. In decent, working condition, they can go for $900.00 or more. This one, working, was priced at around $600.00

If you follow us regularly you know that Anthony has an extensive collection of vintage Fiesta. In 1948, Homer Laughlin’s Pottery Company produced a juice pitcher in celadon green as part of a promotional set to introduce their new Jubilee line. Extremely rare, we have seen this only twice. The first time was at Heart of Ohio Antique Mall in near mint condition and Anthony passed because of the asking price. The second – can’t remember where – but Chris remembers that we passed on it because of a condition issue (hairline crack).

Lest you feel bad for us, we have passed on some things and not regretted it.

On a whirlwind trip in 2008, we visited every family member in the east and 11 states in a 10-day period.  At Smiley’s Antique Mall, Micanopy, FL, Anthony passed on a Kodak Beau Brownie No. 2A for $165.00. Later the same day, we saw another one at a different store for $125.00.  Anthony passed again joking he wanted to find one for $25.00.

 

Still the same trip, a sign for Schoolhouse Antiques (a popular name for schools repurposed into malls) found us driving for deco. We were exploring the different rooms when Anthony let out a gasp.  In his hands, a Kodak Beau Brownie No. 2A for $22.00!

Beau Brownie No. 2A

The Kodak Beau Brownie No. 2A (1930 – 1933). Designed by Walter Dorwin Teague.

 

Anthony found a set of glasses at the Vietnam Vets Thrift Store (now, sadly closed) in Rochester, NY. Six in all, he wasn’t sure what they were but had a gut feeling they were good. Chris was not impressed and thought they were strange looking glasses from the 1970’s.  As 2 were chipped (very small rim chips), Anthony bought the 4 in mint condition for $1.99 each. Ironically, Chris thought he remembered seeing something like them before and thought the pattern was called Rumba.

A little research that night found they were part of Consolidated Glass’ Ruba Rombic line. (Rumba, Ruba – Chris was close!)  This glassware is so rare that minor damage does not affect the value.  As Vietnam Vets was closed the next day, Sunday, Anthony had to wait until Monday at lunchtime to get the other two. Luckily, they were still there. They are currently valued at approximately $250 per glass.

We have since added to the collection but paying premium prices.

Ruba Rombic glassware

Consolidated Glass Company’s Ruba Rombic (1928 – 1932). Designed by Reuben Haley.

We have learned from our past mistakes. Now with more years of collecting experience under our belts, and smart phones, we often do not let great Art Deco antiques get away from us.

Chris & Anthony (The Freakin’, Tiquen’ Guys)

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